Economic and ecological crises: Green New Deals and no-growth economies

This article applies cultural political economy to the global economic and ecological crisis. After theoretical preliminaries concerning economic and ecological imaginaries, the article highlights the multi-dimensional nature of the current crisis and struggles over its interpretation, and concludes with comments on the prospects of a ‘no-growth version of the Green New Deal imaginary.

Inaugural Conference on Cultural Political Economy: Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

A Collaboration between: Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion, Department of Sociology, and the Cultural Political Economy Research Centre, Lancaster University Lancaster University Management School Geography Department, Sheffield University White Rose Social Science Doctoral Research Centre Graduate School of Education, Bristol University School of Environment, Education and Development, Manchester University Management School and Department of…

UK Politics and Global Capitalism

Interview with Bob Jessop, Conducted by Jerko Bakotin, for Jacobin. Recorded in Potsdam, Germany, 5 June 2015. This version may not be identical (for editing reasons) to the version on Jacobin. How do you explain the Conservative’s triumph in British elections? What were the preconditions that set the stage for such a development? We should not…

Thinking State/Space Incompossibly

This paper develops multi-dimensional analyses of socio-spatial relations. Building on previous research, we identify some tensions associated with different dimensions of sociospatiality and introduce the theme of compossible and, more importantly, incompossible sociospatial configurations. Two short studies are deployed to highlight the socio-spatial implications of the principle that not everything that is possible is compossible. The first shows the power of thinking varieties of capitalism compossibly (via the concept of variegated capitalism) and

Theorizing Socio-Spatial Relations

This essay seeks to reframe recent debates on sociospatial theory through the introduction of an approach that can grasp the inherently polymorphic, multidimensional character of sociospatial relations. As previous advocates of a scalar turn, we now question the privileging, in any form, of a single dimension of sociospatial processes, scalar or otherwise. We consider several recent sophisti- cated `turns’ within critical social science; explore their methodological limitations; and highlight several important strands of sociospatial theory that seek to transcend the latter.

States and State Power: A Strategic-Relational Approach

State theorists have usually attempted to theorize the state but this is a misleading focus that risks treating the state as a simple instrument or machine, a reified apparatus that is primarily a source of constraint on political action, or a more or less rational subject that exercises power. Such positions have been criticized from many alternative theoretical positions as well as proven unhelpful in empirical analyses.